Tag Archive for 'Púlsar'

Style guide for Púlsar news agency

Founded in 1995, the Agencia Informativa Púlsar was the world’s first internet-based radio news agency. Now run by AMARC (World Association of Community Radio Broadcasters), the agency provides text and audio news to hundreds of radio stations in Spanish and Portuguese. Púlsar has just published a style guide “El Continente es el Contenido: Manual de estilo de la Agencia Informativa Púlsar” (The Continent is the Content: Agencia Informativa Púlsar style guide”.  The guide is available in PDF from Púlsar’s website.

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The Agencia Informativa Púlsar

In 1996 the Púlsar news agency started up as a regional news service for local, independent and community radio stations in Latin America, providing an alternative to CNN and the major news agencies based in the USA or Europe. It was the world’s first internet-based radio news agency. Now run by AMARC, the agency provides text and audio news to hundreds of radio stations in Spanish and Portuguese. This chapter, by Bruce Girard, founder of Púlsar and editor of The One to Watch discusses the agency’s first years.

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Community radio, new technologies and policy: enough watching, it’s time for doing

by Bruce Girard

In Mali broadcasters search the internet to find answers to listeners’ questions, translate them to local languages, and encourage discussion and learning around issues of public interest. Without the internet Mali’s rural radio stations used a handful of old books and last week’s newspaper as main sources of information, but with access and training they are able to find information on the internet and help discover solutions to community problems. They are only able to do this because visionary policies and programmes enabled community radio and provided them with internet access and training.

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